Cystic Fibrosis

Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease that affects a large number of children every year in North America itself. This disease affects the mucus glands that produce mucus, sweat, enzymes and other secretions.

The most serious consequence of this disease occurs in the lungs, pancreas, and intestines, all of which are clogged with thick mucus. As the lungs become congested, they get especially vulnerable to pneumonia and other infections.

When the ducts that normally carry pancreatic enzymes to the small intestine become clogged, difficulty in breaking down fats and protein is the result along with other digestive problems. Abnormal amounts of salt are lost in sweat and saliva, which can lead to serious imbalance in body chemistry.



Presently there is no cure for cystic fibrosis, although scientists are testing gene therapy as a means of correcting the underlying genetic defect.

At this moment a combination of enriched diet, vitamin supplements, replacement enzymes, antibiotics and other medications, and regular postural drainage to clear mucus from the lungs serves as the best treatment and has greatly improved the outlook for people with cystic fibrosis.

Here are meal-planning tips for a patient of cystic fibrosis. Start with balanced diet like other members of the family and then add extra calories and nutrients that are needed for them.

Eat large portion of high calorie foods. Enrich whole milk by adding a cup of whole dried milk powder to each liter. Consume plenty of high protein – fish, poultry, eggs, meat and other things. Starch and little amount is sugar is required for energy.

Salty food is needed to replace the salt
that is lost in great amount through sweat. That is why eat snacks frequently if you suffer from this disease. Since diet is critical in managing cystic fibrosis, the treatment team usually includes a cynical dietician. To grow properly, children with cystic fibrosis typically need to consume many more calories than are normally recommended.

In the past it was almost impossible to meet these markedly increased
calorie demands because of the body’s inability to digest and absorb fats and protein. The development of improved enzyme preparations to supplement or replace those normally produced by the pancreas has helped solve this problem.

Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease that affects a large number of children every year in North America itself. This disease affects the mucus glands that produce mucus, sweat, enzymes and other secretions.

The most serious consequence of this disease occurs in the lungs, pancreas, and intestines, all of which are clogged with thick mucus. As the lungs become congested, they get especially vulnerable to pneumonia and other infections.

When the ducts that normally carry pancreatic enzymes to the small intestine become clogged, difficulty in breaking down fats and protein is the result along with other digestive problems. Abnormal amounts of salt are lost in sweat and saliva, which can lead to serious imbalance in body chemistry.

Presently there is no cure for cystic fibrosis, although scientists are testing gene therapy as a means of correcting the underlying genetic defect.

At this moment a combination of enriched diet, vitamin supplements, replacement enzymes, antibiotics and other medications, and regular postural drainage to clear mucus from the lungs serves as the best treatment and has greatly improved the outlook for people with cystic fibrosis.

Here are meal-planning tips for a patient of cystic fibrosis. Start with balanced diet like other members of the family and then add extra calories and nutrients that are needed for them.

Eat large portion of high calorie foods. Enrich whole milk by adding a cup of whole dried milk powder to each liter. Consume plenty of high protein – fish, poultry, eggs, meat and other things. Starch and little amount is sugar is required for energy.

Salty food is needed to replace the salt that is lost in great amount through sweat. That is why eat snacks frequently if you suffer from this disease. Since diet is critical in managing cystic fibrosis, the treatment team usually includes a cynical dietician. To grow properly, children with cystic fibrosis typically need to consume many more calories than are normally recommended.

In the past it was almost impossible to meet these markedly increased calorie demands because of the body’s inability to digest and absorb fats and protein. The development of improved enzyme preparations to supplement or replace those normally produced by the pancreas has helped solve this problem.